Big in Japan 6

R24,800.00

Karen Stewart

Big in Japan 6, 2019

70 x 50 cm

Charcoal on Fine Art papers, washi paper and Fabriano Unica 250gsm Fine Art Papers, washi paper and Fabriano Unica 250gsm Framed in aluminum with AR99% UV Glass

R24,800.00

This work is about materiality - honouring the bautifyul paper that I work with. In this series I am using papers that friend of mine brought back from Tokyo for me. Washi papers. Tesuki washi (handmade Japanese paper) was invented in 105 AD by a Chinese official named Cai Lun, and introduced to Japan in 610 AD by Doncho, a Buddhist monk from Korea. The name Sekishu comes from the Sekishu region (present-day Iwami), where the paper was first produced, where from then on the art of handmade washi has been maintained and preserved within the area. The raw materials for Sekishu washi are kozo, mitsumata, and gampi shrubs. Kozo and mitsumata are cultivated in the region but gampi grows wild. Sekishu-banshi made from Sekishu kozo is well known as the strongest paper produced in Japan. By the Edo period (1603-1867), Sekishu-banshi was popular among Osaka merchants for use in account books, and that name became widely known. In addition, the techniques and methods used for Sekishu-banshi have been completely preserved by the crafts people who live in Misumi Town. Sekishu-banshi was registered at “the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity” based on the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2009 thus officially recognising the craft as “Washi, craftsmanship of traditional Japanese hand-made paper”.

Description

This work is about materiality – honouring the bautifyul paper that I work with. In this series I am using papers that friend of mine brought back from Tokyo for me. Washi papers. Tesuki washi (handmade Japanese paper) was invented in 105 AD by a Chinese official named Cai Lun, and introduced to Japan in 610 AD by Doncho, a Buddhist monk from Korea. The name Sekishu comes from the Sekishu region (present-day Iwami), where the paper was first produced, where from then on the art of handmade washi has been maintained and preserved within the area. The raw materials for Sekishu washi are kozo, mitsumata, and gampi shrubs. Kozo and mitsumata are cultivated in the region but gampi grows wild. Sekishu-banshi made from Sekishu kozo is well known as the strongest paper produced in Japan. By the Edo period (1603-1867), Sekishu-banshi was popular among Osaka merchants for use in account books, and that name became widely known. In addition, the techniques and methods used for Sekishu-banshi have been completely preserved by the crafts people who live in Misumi Town. Sekishu-banshi was registered at “the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity” based on the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2009 thus officially recognising the craft as “Washi, craftsmanship of traditional Japanese hand-made paper”.

Additional information

Dimensions 50.0 × 70.0 cm
ag_artwork_year

2019

ag_medium_text

Charcoal on Fine Art papers, washi paper and Fabriano Unica 250gsm Fine Art Papers, washi paper and Fabriano Unica 250gsm Framed in aluminum with AR99% UV Glass

ag_series

Big in Japan, 2019

ag_edition_master_record

0

ag_original

0

ag_edition

Not part of an edition